“MIA&I” | Independent Movie Review

Langdon Alger | Independent Movie Review
REVIEW:

Well to cut to the chase, I think I really liked MIA&I. I actually watched it twice back to back. Well, I had some questions after the first pass, but because it was good, and under an hour, was able to check it out again easily.

MIA&I is a story, by Stephen Angel and Dean Ravell, about a woman acquiring a new android assistant and getting far more than she bargained for with the new product line.

Sophie, the android acquiring introvert, played by Roxanne Rose Modricky, and Mia, the HARP (Humanoid Application for Residential Purpose), played by Candice Burgess-Look, both did a really good job and had no problem carrying the majority of the project. Ford, the ARC (Atman Robotics Corporation) technician, played by Caelan Curry, did a fine job as well and had a nice rapport with Sophie… or was it the Mia?

The actual story felt like something I had seen before, but I don’t know where, so either this has been done before and they put a twist on it, or it’s an original concept. Either way I’d like to figure out what I saw before and watch it again or, if it hasn’t been done before, I’d like to see the story stretched out and with a larger budget to really explore its potential and to expand on the characters.

That was actually one of the negatives of the project. I think producing this story on an independent budget felt a little ambitious because it created some weak points, but honestly, that’s kind of nitpicking, and it really didn’t effect me liking the project.

MIA&I had it’s flaws, but overall it was a good story; quirky, light, dark, funny, cute and had a great ending that left you wondering. So, if you can check out this project I would recommend it.

TECHNICAL CRITIQUE:

Not too many complaints technically with this project at all. Nothing super flashy, but nothing really bad at all either. They used these HARP commercials to break things up that felt a little weird and maybe could have been done a little better. And there was a critical point in the story where the one character whispered a really important thing and you literally can not hear what she said because she really whispered it. Luckily you understand, if you’re paying attention, to what she was trying to do, so you don’t really need to hear it, but besides that again, pretty good technically all around.